The Associated Press

Published: October 24, 2006
DUBROVNIK, Croatia A leading European regional security group ended a two-day conference Tuesday concluding that education about the Holocaust, tolerance and understanding were key elements in fighting anti-Semitism, racism and xenophobia.

The meeting was organized by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and brought together about 150 politicians and officials from non-governmental agencies of the group’s member countries.

“Our societies have to protect themselves against the threats to security and stability emanating from racist violence, hate crimes and intolerant speech,” said Christian Strohal, a human rights envoy of the OSCE.

“With this meeting, the OSCE draws attention to the crucial role of education for societies that seek to protect their pluralism against such threats,” he said.

The participants met in workshops during two days at this Adriatic resort town discussing teaching methods and lesson plans as part of ongoing efforts to combat discrimination, racism and other forms of intolerance in Europe.

The 56-member OSCE will continue similar conferences before its ministerial council on Dec. 4-5 with the aim of developing a binding resolution on tolerance.

DUBROVNIK, Croatia A leading European regional security group ended a two-day conference Tuesday concluding that education about the Holocaust, tolerance and understanding were key elements in fighting anti-Semitism, racism and xenophobia.

The meeting was organized by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and brought together about 150 politicians and officials from non-governmental agencies of the group’s member countries.

“Our societies have to protect themselves against the threats to security and stability emanating from racist violence, hate crimes and intolerant speech,” said Christian Strohal, a human rights envoy of the OSCE.

“With this meeting, the OSCE draws attention to the crucial role of education for societies that seek to protect their pluralism against such threats,” he said.

The participants met in workshops during two days at this Adriatic resort town discussing teaching methods and lesson plans as part of ongoing efforts to combat discrimination, racism and other forms of intolerance in Europe.

The 56-member OSCE will continue similar conferences before its ministerial council on Dec. 4-5 with the aim of developing a binding resolution on tolerance.