JAN 7
By Ori Lewis
JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Israeli legislators voted on Monday to form an inquiry commission with executive powers to probe years of failure by the Jewish state to provide adequate financial help for needy survivors of the Nazi Holocaust.

Israel’s establishment in 1948 with international backing came after the arrival of hundreds of thousands of refugees and Holocaust survivors from Europe after World War Two.

Many of the survivors, now elderly and infirm, have complained for years of not receiving adequate funding to allow them to live out their remaining years in dignity.

“Holocaust survivors are tired of promises and they have been treated failingly for years,” said Zvulun Orlev, who heads Israel’s parliamentary state audit committee.

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READ YEDIOT ARCHARONOT HERE.

READ HAARETZ HERE


READ JERUSALEM POST ARTICLE HERE.

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COLUMNISTS

Orlev: Spotlight on previous administrations too

By Anshel Pfeffer and Moti Bassok

The Knesset’s State Control Committee has decided to establish an official commission of inquiry into the state’s maltreatment of Holocaust survivors, committee chairman Zvulun Orlev (National Religious Party) announced yesterday.

A special report issued in August by State Comptroller Micha Lindenstrauss was harshly critical of how successive Israeli governments and other public entities had treated survivors over the years. Orlev’s committee recently warned that unless the handling of state stipends for survivors improved, an official inquiry would be needed to advance matters. Advertisement

Supreme Court President Dorit Beinisch will appoint the members of the commission, which by law must be headed by a sitting or retired Supreme Court justice. The commission will have full investigative powers, including to subpoena witnesses and documents

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JAN 11 HAARETZ
Inquiry into survivor benefits lacks clear mandate

By Anshel Pfeffer

Ever since Zevulun Orlev, the chairman of the Knesset’s State Control Committee, announced the establishment of a commission of inquiry on the matter of allowances for Holocaust survivors, the preparations have been proceeding swiftly. Orlev reached an agreement with Supreme Court President Dorit Beinisch over the quick appointment of a chairman and members for the committee, and has even managed to draft its official mandate.

But the commission’s exact task is still unclear. Is it meant to examine the failures of the present government in allocating allowances, or to look at past government’s actions on the matter? Or maybe its job is to set future standards for survivors’ rights?

According to the first section of the mandate, which defines the areas the committee will investigate, it seems that its task is a bit of all of the above.
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