YNET.COM
Israeli Holocaust survivor finally learns about father’s fate from secret archive

Secret German archive containing largest registry of Holocaust victims ever opened its doors to public in November; Red Cross has begun transferring digital copies of documents to Yad Vashem

Associated Press Published: 01.18.08, 17:33 / Israel Jewish Scene

In 1942, 8-year-old Moshe Bar-Yuda walked hand-in-hand with his father to a collection point in his hometown in Slovakia, and watched him being shipped off to a Nazi labor camp. The boy never saw him again, and for 65 years was left to wonder about his father’s fate.

Now, because of a newly reopened Nazi archive, the mystery has been resolved.
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NBC NEWS CHANNEL 4

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington is helping survivors of the Holocaust get answers about their past.

The museum is helping them navigate a vast Nazi archive that promises to document their persecution and provide clues to the fate of family members who were killed.

In August, the organization that administers the archive began transferring the documents from a depository in Germany to the D.C. museum and two other museums — one in Israel and another in Poland.

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Holocaust Survivor Finds Answers through Red Cross

THE RED CROSS:

A clearinghouse for people seeking to learn the fate of missing loved ones helps answer their uncertainty
By Douglas Lent, Communications Specialist, Central Maryland Chapter

Thursday, January 17, 2008 — In July 1942, at age nine, Rachel Miller’s mother gave her a new name and sent her to live in the French countryside. Three days later, her mother, two brothers and her only sister were taken to Camp Pithiviers, one of the Nazi regime’s “transit camps” where detainees were held before being deported to concentration camps in Germany.

The American Red Cross helped Rachel Miller find answers regarding the death of her brothers during the Holocaust.
(Photo: American Red Cross)
Miller never saw her family again.

After the war, Miller emigrated to the United States but was haunted by unanswered questions about whether her relatives might still be alive. Desperate for answers, she contacted her local Red Cross chapter.

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HERALDSUN.COM.AU

A US museum has started helping Holocaust survivors search a vast Nazi archive to find documents on their persecution and clues to the fate of family members.

After months of work on more than 100 million digital images from the files, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum said it would today begin answering requests for information from survivors and their families.

In August, the International Tracing Service of the International Committee of the Red Cross began transferring the documents from their depository in Bad Arolsen, Germany.

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NEWSDAY.COM

Holocaust records to be opened for first time
BY CARL MACGOWAN | carl.macgowan@newsday.com
January 18, 2008

Survivors of concentration camps and the descendants of Holocaust victims now have a new way of finding out information about loved ones who died at the hands of the Nazis.

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., yesterday announced it would begin providing information from the International Tracing Service archive to survivors and families previously stymied in their search for answers. Many of them had been frustrated because a German archive remained closed more than 60 years after the end of World War II.

“It’s so exciting, because of the possibilities of maybe some people getting some information where they didn’t before,” said Beth Lilach, director of education at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County in Glen Cove.

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THECUTTINGEDGE.COM

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum today launched an ambitious and daunting new program of “individualized research” program to help Holocaust survivors obtain precious documentation about their Nazi enslavement.

The new program “begins right now,” said Arthur Berger, USHMM director of external communications in a Museum corridor just moments after a closed-door briefing with survivors, details of which were provided first to The Cutting Edge News. The “individualized research” will probe a triad of major archival collections. These include some 46 million documents derived from several countries now in the existing USHMM collections, plus the first central names index and related documentation just transferred from the International Tracing Service at Bad Arolsen, and finally the bulk of 35 million Bad Arolsen files scheduled to be transferred between 2010 and 2011.

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CHRON.COM

Data on Holocaust victims made available to public
Museum shares records on about 17 million victims

By ERIC ROSENBERG
Copyright 2008 Hearst News Service

• What: The collection contains more than 100 million digital images of documents.

• Who: The documents relate to approximately 17.5 million Jews and non-Jews, who at one point came under control of the Nazis.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum has begun helping Holocaust survivors, their family members and researchers gain access to a huge trove of Nazi-era records detailing the fates of millions of victims.

Museum officials last week announced they were making available via online request digital copies of the records, which include Nazi-generated documents on concentration camp rosters, slave labor camps, transport manifests, ghetto inhabitants, and arrest records. They also include allied documents on victims housed at displaced persons camps after the end of World War II in 1945.

To access the data
Museum officials hope the documents provide people with the details of the fates of loved ones.

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TOWNHALL.COM

Holocaust Survivor Learns Father’s Fate
By ARON HELLER
Wednesday, January 16, 2008

In 1942, 8-year-old Moshe Bar-Yuda walked hand-in-hand with his father to a collection point in his hometown in Slovakia and watched him being shipped off to a Nazi labor camp. The boy never saw him again, and for 66 years was left to wonder about his father’s fate.

Because of a newly opened Nazi archive, the mystery has been resolved.
Holocaust survivor Moshe Ber-Yuda, 74, sits at is house in Tel-Aviv, Israel, Wednesday Jan. 16, 2008. In 1942, 8-year-old Bar-Yuda watched as his father was shipped from his hometown in Slovakia to a Nazi labor camp. He never saw him again and for 65 years was left to wonder about his father’s fate.Now, thanks to a newly reopened Nazi archive, the mystery has ended. Bar-Yuda, is one of the few survivors in the world to obtain Nazi documents that were stashed away for more than 60 years in a secret German archive containing the largest registry of Holocaust victims ever. The archive proved that Bar-Yuda’s father, Avraham Kastner, was killed in the gas chambers and then cremated at the Majdanek death camp in Poland. (AP Photo/Moti Milrod) Bar-Yuda, now 74, was one of the first to obtain Nazi documents now available to the public after they were stashed away for more than 60 years in a secret German archive. Up to now, only limited queries were answered.

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THEWEST.COM.AU

Holocaust files set to help survivors

19th January 2008, 15:00 WST

An American museum has begun helping Holocaust survivors navigate a vast nazi archive that promises to document their persecution and provide clues to the fate of family members.

After months of work on more than 100 million digital images from the files, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum was announcing on Thursday that it would begin answering requests from survivors and their families for information.

In August, the International Tracing Service of the International Committee of the Red Cross, which administers the archive, began transferring the documents from their depository in Bad Arolsen, Germany, to the Washington museum and to two others — Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust memorial on the outskirts of Jerusalem, and the Institute of National Remembrance in the Polish capital, Warsaw.

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