Women and men who were children or teens during World War II, when their bones were developing, are at higher risk of decalcified bones. Osteoporosis – the thinning of bones that can lead to dangerous fractures – can be a direct result of starvation and emotional stress, and is common among Holocaust survivors, according to a bone expert at Sheba Medical Center. Dr. Iris Vered of the osteoporosis service in the Tel Hashomer hospital’s endocrine institute has completed a unique study of a large number of survivors. She found that women and men who were children or teens during World War II, when their bones were developing, are at higher risk of decalcified bones than contemporaries who did not live through those terrible years. News of her study was published in the medical center’s September newsletter.