SWEDEN’S royal family – recovering from revelations of the secret affair the king enjoyed with a pop singer – has been thrown into fresh turmoil over the Nazi past of the queen’s father. Swedish TV has broadcast the first of a two-part documentary detailing how Queen Silvia‘s late father grew rich producing armaments in a factory stolen from the Jews. When she married in 1976 the Queen’s German father Walter Sommerlath denied he had ever been a member of the Nazi party. That fiction was exposed some years later by a Swedish newspaper which proved he joined the movement in 1934. Earlier this year Queen Silvia spoke for the first time about it in a TV documentary in which she said he was not “politically active´´ and that the factory he ran produced toy trains and hair dryers, as well as parts for gasmasks for civilians. She said he did not take the factory over from Jewish owners. Now the revelations about Sommerlath, who was living in Brazil at the time he joined the Nazis and only returned to Germany on the eve of war, have plunged the royals into a new crisis. Swedish investigative journalist Bosse Schön says, “The truth about Queen Silvia’s father, which she doesn’t want to tell herself or her family, is that he joined Hitler’s Nazi party beginning on December 1st, 1934. “Also, Queen Silvia’s father worked during his time in Brazil for the German company Acos-Burderus-do Brasil-Ltda, which used wartime prisoners as slave labour in Nazi Germany.” Sommelath resettled in Berlin and on 24 May 1939 he took over the company Wechsler & Hennig. Documents show he took over the firm from Efim Wechsler, a Jew, and that this was part of the so-called “Ayranization“ of such enterprises according to the Nuremberg Laws which stripped Jews of their rights and property.