Budapest – The trial of Hungarian Nazi war crime suspect Sandor Kepiro resumed on Thursday after physical and mental health checks showed the 97-year-old was fit enough to attend, even if extremely frail.During the short hearing, Judge Bela Varga read out a statement dating back to 1948 by one of the soldiers – since deceased – whom Kepiro allegedly ordered to round up and shoot 30 people in the Serbian town of Novi Sad in 1942.Kepiro, who appeared in court in a wheelchair, dismissed the statement as a “blatant lie”, insisted he did not know the solider, named as Janos Nagy, and again denied any involvement in the killings.Little information is available about Nagy, other than he was tried and sentenced to life for murder by a communist court in 1948.The case against Kepiro rests almost exclusively on such written statements by soldiers who are now dead, as well as documents from a trial in 1942 in which Kepiro was found guilty in absentia.Experts have argued that there were numerous errors and omissions in the translation of a number of those court documents, thus casting doubt on their reliability.