Auschwitz metal stamps with embedded needles, which were used by Nazis to tattoo inmates, have been discovered in Poland in ‘one of the most important finds in years’

Discovered metal stamps, with a-few-millimetre-long needles, used for tattooing KL Auschwitz prisoners Photo: EPA

Discovered metal stamps, with a-few-millimetre-long needles, used for tattooing KL Auschwitz prisoners Photo: EPA

Metal stamps with embedded needles that the SS once used to tattoo inmates at the notorious Nazi death camp at Auschwitz have been discovered in Poland.
The find has been hailed by the Auschwitz museum, which now stands on the site of the camp, as one “of the most significant in years” as it was thought no original tattooing equipment survived the war.
SS soldiers used the small stamps, consisting of a two, two threes and a six or a nine, to tattoo inmates as they were processed on their arrival at the camp in German-occupied Poland.
Some prisoners got the tattoo on the chest but most were tattooed on their arms, and the numbers became a hallmark of Auschwitz’s inhumanity.
“This is one of the most important finds in years,” said Piotr Cywinski, director of the Auschwitz museum. “We never believed that we would get the original tools for tattooing prisoners after such a long time.
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