Category Archive: Trivializing the Holocaust

Paris museum calls Auschwitz a ‘Bauhaus architectural achievement’

Local Jewish leader protests insult to the memory of death camp victims, says early 20th-century art movement ‘has enough lovely projects’

ruboff1526-resp1090-2PARIS (JTA) — A French arts museum defined the death camp Auschwitz as “an architectural achievement of the Bauhaus movement.”

The “Spirit of the Bauhaus,” which opened in October at the Museum of Decorative Arts, includes SS officer Fritz Ertl’s designs for the extermination camp among the major achievements of the modernist art movement and school active in the years preceding the rise of Nazism.

Historians of the movement have debated whether the school, which was denounced as decadent by the Nazi regime, bears responsibility for disciples who went on to work for the Third Reich.

Francis Kalifat, the president of the CRIF umbrella group of French Jewish communities, wrote a letter of protest Friday to the museum director.

In his statement, which Kalifat also sent to Culture Minister Audrey Azoulay, who is Jewish, he wrote: “The Bauhaus movement has enough lovely projects that make it unnecessary to insult the memory” of approximately 1 million Jews who were murdered at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Bauhaus was a German art school operational from 1919 to 1933 that gave its name to the utilitarian architectural style perfected by many of the school’s graduates.

Tel Aviv, where many German Jews immigrated in the 1920s and ’30s, is one of the world’s most Bauhaus-rich cities, with more than 4,000 buildings classified as belonging to that style.

After the Nazis shuttered the school in 1933, most of its artists and architects left the country. Some who remained worked for the Nazis with various degrees of enthusiasm, according to Nicholas Fox Weber, the author of a book on the subject.

Ertl, who trained at Bauhaus from 1928 to 1931, became a member of the Waffen-SS in 1941 and contributed the plans of the barracks at Auschwitz-Birkenau, according to Le Figaro. He and another architect, Walter Dejaco, were tried in Vienna in 1972 and acquitted on charges of abetting mass murder.

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Croatian president poses with pro-Nazi regime symbol

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic photographed with coat-of-arms of Ustasha, which persecuted and killed vast numbers of Serbs, Jews, Roma and anti-fascists

15110261_10209507936608588_4074372119233309036_o-e1480201423583-635x357ZAGREB — Croatian President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic sparked online debate Saturday as it emerged she posed for a photo during her recent Canada trip with a flag carrying a symbol of her country’s wartime pro-Nazi regime.

Her office shrugged off the incident, insisting there was “nothing questionable” about it.

The photo, posted on Facebook by a Croatian man living in Canada, shows Grabar-Kitarovic posing with him and others in front of a flag bearing the coat of arms used by Croatia’s World War II-era Ustasha regime, which persecuted and killed hundreds of thousands of Serbs, Jews, Roma and anti-fascists.

The checkerboard-patterned shield in the middle of Croatia’s current national flag has 25 red and white squares, starting with a red one in the top-left corner.

A different version with a white square in that corner has been used at other points in Croatia’s history — notably by the Ustasha. It was replaced by the current shield after World War II when Croatia was part of the former Yugoslavia.

Both versions were briefly in use in 1990 ahead of Croatia’s declaration of independence, but under a December 1990 law the national flag bears the red-first version of the shield.

The presidency batted off the row over the photo of Grabar-Kitarovic, telling N1 television, “We see nothing questionable in it.” It noted that such a flag was displayed in front of the Croatian parliament in 1990.

The president’s view on the wartime regime is “clear and she voiced it on several occasions,” it added. Grabar-Kitarovic has condemned the Ustasha in the past.

The row sparked mixed responses online.

“This issue involving our president is more than shameful,” Visnja Skreblin, a woman from Zagreb, commented on online portal Index.

But reader Mario Babic defended the president, saying it was “Croatia’s historic shield, created far before the darkest chapter of Croatia’s history.”

Grabar-Kitarovic took over the presidency — a role with limited powers — in 2015 as the candidate of the ruling conservative HDZ party.

The previous HDZ-led government, which fell in June, was accused by critics of turning a blind eye to a far-right surge in the country, including nostalgia for the pro-Nazi past.

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Comment: ‘Everyone I hate is Hitler’- Dangerous politicization of antisemitism

An NYPD report on November 6 showed there were 103 antisemitic incidents so far in 2016 compared to 125 for all of 2015 – so basically no change.

AUS administration run by the “alt-right neo-Nazi movement,” claims a commentator online. The chief strategist is an American Goebbels. One meme reads: “First they came for the Muslims and we said ‘not this time mother –’” signed by someone named April Daniels. A cartoon by Eli Valley shows Pepe the frog (a symbol of the far Right) speaking with Sheldon Adelson, saying, “So it’s agreed we exterminate the Jews here and you can exterminate the Palestinian there.” To which the Adelson character says, “Sign me up.” Liana Fincke drew a cartoon showing a devil wearing a swastika saying “vote for me I’m pro-Israel” and another man saying “duh… okay.” A journalist posted a “template for how to respond” if approached by Trump with a letter from 1962 from Bertrand Russell to British fascist Oswald Mosley.

“Trump has shattered Jews’ American idyll,” claimed Chemi Shalev. “American Jews have transformed virtually overnight from insiders to outsiders. If worse comes to worst, they’ll always have Israel.”

The Anti-Defamation League’s national director claimed that the US “has not seen this level of antisemitism in mainstream political and public discourse since the 1930s.” One more piece of evidence.

The Associated Press tells us “American Jews alarmed by surge in antisemitism.”

But the actual statistics on hate crimes are more vague.

An NYPD report on November 6 showed there were 103 antisemitic incidents so far in 2016 compared to 125 for all of 2015 – so basically no change. According to the FBI there were 664 anti-Jewish incidents in 2015 (there were 257 against Muslims and 1,700 against African-Americans). That’s an increase from 609 in 2014. Back in 1996 there were 1,109.

An ADL blog claimed a “rash of vandalism and swastikas reported following election day.” The same ADL asserted that “antisemitic assaults rise dramatically across the country in 2015.” Actual numbers showed a 3% increase from 2014; 941 incidents versus 912. Rather than a dramatic rise, New York showed a decrease in incidents, from 231 to 198. But “antisemitism decreases” is not a headline. “Worst antisemitism since 1930s” is.

There is no doubt people are alarmed in America. An article in Fortune noted that over 800 journalists had reported antisemitism on Twitter related to this election.

Part of the reason people are alarmed is because of the hundreds, probably thousands of articles about the “surge” and “spike” in antisemitism since the US election – none of which actually showed any data about the supposed increase and most of which relied on data from before the election or from 2015 (one report claimed “US hate crimes against Muslims surge 67 percent,” but the data all related to a surge in 2015, not 2016). “Trump’s election triggers old nightmares for Holocaust survivors in America,” wrote Marisa Fox-Bevilacqua at Haaretz. They’ve been triggered because of a wave of hysteria and psychosis that has pushed fearmongering to extraordinary levels. Probably never in history have so many people written so much about so little antisemitism.

How did we get here? For years those crying “antisemitism” tended to be associated with pro-Israel Jewish voices.

Ruth Wisse at Tablet wrote in May 2015 that “antisemitism on American college campuses is rising and worsening.”

She quoted a Louis D. Brandeis Center survey showing “more than half of Jewish American college students personally experienced or witnessed antisemitism.” However almost all the examples in the article related to anti-Israel events. “Every year, some 200 campuses now host a multiday hate-Jews fest, its malignancy encapsulated in its title: ‘Israel Apartheid Week.’” Antisemitism was “spiking” and “skyrocketing” on campus, newspapers told us. The Observer claimed one report showed 287 antisemitic incidents by June 2016 compared to 198 in 2015. “Campus events denying the right of Israel to exist – which nearly tripled,” was a major component.

There were also other incidents of non-Israel related antisemitism such as Oberlin College’s former assistant- professor Joy Karega posting on social media stories claiming the Rothschilds control the world. As recently as November 2 the Zionist Organization of America was speaking out about antisemitism on campus.

In a sense it was the Jewish Right that dominated and owned the “antisemitism rising” brand. In the 1980s the extremist rabbi Meir Kahane even used to talk about a “second Holocaust” in America. But the election in 2016 changed all that. Suddenly people on the Left began to worry that what they called “alt-right white supremacy” was connected to the Donald Trump campaign. In September The Daily Beast published “Alt-Right leaders: We aren’t racist, we just hate Jews.” Combined with the antisemitic attacks on journalist Julia Ioffe in April after her profile of Melania Trump, the Left began to take back the “antisemitism is a threat” story.

Piecing together a few quotes from articles at Breitbart, one of which was written by David Horowitz (who is Jewish), many writers connected the dots to dangerous antisemitism circulating around the campaign. When Trump won the election Samuel Freedman called it the “revenge of white supremacy” and Bradley Burston claimed it was a “historic victory for antisemitism.” The target of these writers was often Stephen Bannon and his association with Breitbart. “What’s more, unlike Trump, Bannon does not appear to be merely manipulating these people for political gain. He really hates us,” wrote Eric Alterman. There was actually scant evidence of Bannon’s antisemitism, as Alan Dershowitz has pointed out, but if you tell a story long enough it appears to be true.

So what is really going on? Many voices on the Left have used antisemitism as a tool against the Trump administration, exaggerating the levels of antisemitism and the extent of it. They disregard evidence that Trump grew up around Jews and indeed that his family is intermarried with Jews, and they disregard that Bannon even created an Israeli-run version of his website. Unfortunately, just as the Right exaggerated rising campus antisemitism, misinterpreting every anti-Israel act as pernicious (accusing Jewish groups who are anti-Zionist of being antisemitic), the Left exaggerates every hint of racism on the right as antisemitic, when in reality much of the racism is directed at other communities. Of course the racism is vile, but it should be confronted as racism, not “antisemitism.”

The two abuses of antisemitism have agendas. On the Right the exaggeration of increased antisemitism on campus was related to a campaign to defend Israel. Antisemitism was hijacked as a way to color all anti-Israel views as antisemitic and the very real dangers of real antisemitism was ignored to achieve the larger pro-Israel goal. The boycott movement, apartheid week, Palestinian flags – it’s all “antisemitism.”

The Left’s voices against antisemitism also have an Israel- centric narrative to them, that seeks to tar pro-Israel groups as not only whitewashing antisemitism but being tied to Trump to discredit them. “Trump lends hope to Israel’s right,” The New York Times claimed. “Trump emboldens Israel’s far right,” wrote Saeb Erakat. America’s “most powerful Jewish organizations” have “kept quiet during the most bigoted presidential campaign in history,” wrote Peter Beinart.

They even perform the trick of pulling an antisemitic rabbit out of a Zionist hat. “Strange but true that many ardent Zionists view Western antisemitism as good,” wrote journalist Dan Murphy on Twitter. “How Bannon and Brietbart can be pro-Israel and antisemitic at the same time,” headlined The Forward. In the article Todd Gitlin at Columbia University claimed that “the coexistence of antisemitism and right-wing Zionism ‘in Trump’s world make sense.’” A new narrative is forming to claim that Zionism is actually a form of antisemitism. This fulfills a kind of fantasy on parts the Left whereby being pro-Israel will now be seen as a component of being antisemitic, which will mean that the reality of radical-left antisemitism will forever be inured from claims it is antisemitic.

“Israeli Right works with antisemites” is that goal many anti-Zionists have always had in mind since the 1920s when they suggested that Zionism was a form of antisemitism because it called into question the place of Diaspora Jewry. The strange intersection of this election has allowed this fringe view to take center stage.

Rarely in history has antisemitism been so politicized, so untethered from real acts of antisemitism. Can we escape the train wreck that is about to happen, where some elements of the Left tar Zionism as antisemitism and the Right stays mired in its over-use of claims of antisemitism? In the recent documentary The Last Laugh, co-writers Ferne Pearlstein and Robert Edwards looked at comedians making fun of the Holocaust. In the film many comedians, such as Sarah Silverman, make fun of the genocide, calling it “alleged Holocaust” in one scene. She’s mocking antisemites, but what happens when antisemites think it’s funny? There is also “Holocaust fatigue,” says Edwards. “When it gets to the point where people roll their eyes and it has no effect anymore, then you have a real problem.” Have we watered it down too much? In the 2013 Pew Survey, “remembering the Holocaust” was the most important aspect of Jewish identity for 73 percent of American Jews. Antisemitism is a major portion of identity. But we’ve also educated generations to see more antisemitism than there is, to mock the Holocaust while at the same time seeing a new Holocaust as just around the corner as media claims we live in the 1930s.

Claiming “antisemitism” is easy, but that’s precisely why it should be done sparingly.

Too much crying wolf over antisemitism has harmed its meaning. It is also leading to shocking levels of people believing they are just years away from being sent to concentration camps. An honest discussion should be had on the Left and Right of American Jewry to stop exaggerating and work to confront real incidents of antisemitism and not waste time inventing bogeymen and fearmongering.

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Nazi hunter to Lithuanian mayor: Stop recreational concentration camp use

Holocaust historian Dr. Efraim Zuroff slams use of the Seventh Fort heritage site for such activities as “disgraceful.”

By TAMARA ZIEVE


Wiesenthal CenterThe Simon Wiesenthal Center has called on the mayor of Kaunas, Lithuania, to put an immediate end to recreational activities held at a former concentration camp at the Seventh Fort heritage site.

The letter comes following JTA’s report that the site is used as a wedding venue, in addition to the services offered on the Seventh Fort website which include children’s parties and camps, military themed birthday parties, and themed parties for adults.

In a letter on Tuesday addressed to Kaunas (formerly Kovno) Mayor Visvaldas Matijosaitis, the Wiesenthal Center’s director for Eastern European Affairs, Dr. Efraim Zuroff, slammed the use of the site for such activities as “disgraceful.”

“As you no doubt are aware, the site of the mass murder of several thousand Jews in 1941 was privatized several years ago, and has now been turned into a recreation and entertainment center which violates the memory of the victims,” Zuroff wrote.

Critics say this reality is a byproduct of Lithuania’s failure to confront the country’s dark history during the genocide.

“This sad situation was revealed already several months ago in Musiskiai, the book Ruta Vanagaite and I wrote about the subject of Holocaust memory and commemoration in Lithuania,” Zuroff stated.

He urged the mayor to immediately suspend the above-mentioned activities, and to find a way to restore the site to the municipality or to an organization “whose purpose will be to honor the memory of the victims, rather than insult them.”

Zuroff expressed his outrage to The Jerusalem Post: “How do you privatize a mass-murder site?” he asked, adding that if one does so, they have an obligation to ensure it is not misused.

The remains of 5,000 murdered Jews are buried at the Seventh Fort in mass graves that are marked by a few poles and rocks. Relatives sometimes light candles in memory of the dead.

The Military Heritage Center’s website tells of the area’s Holocaust-era significance, and offers, for a fee, tours of the former killing site alongside a general tour about the fort’s military history. It also has a military history museum, but does not have a permanent exhibit about the Holocaust.

The revelation of the various uses of the site sparked widespread outrage, and Zuroff released a call on social media to join him in protesting the situation by putting pressure on the mayor.

JTA contributed to this report.

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Auschwitz asks ‘Pokemon Go’ to keep monsters out of death camp

Officials at US memorial sites also scramble to ban popular game, as app’s cartoon critters pop up in least appropriate locales

smartphone-brandenburgThe Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland says it is not allowing people to play “Pokemon Go” on their smartphones during visits to the former Nazi German death camp because it is “disrespectful on many levels.”

The game uses GPS and mapping capabilities in smartphones to let players roam the real world to find “Pokestops” stocked with supplies and hunt cartoon character monsters to capture and train them for battles.

Museum spokesman Pawel Sawicki told The Associated Press on Wednesday that its authorities were asking game producers to exclude the site of the former Nazi German death camp from games.

Allowing such games to be active on the authentic grounds of the former death camp is “disrespectful to the memory of the victims of the German Nazi concentration and extermination camp on many levels and it is absolutely inappropriate,” Sawicki said.

Sawicki added the museum had already contacted game creators and asked them “not to allow the site of Auschwitz Memorial and other similar sites to be included in the game.”

The museum at Auschwitz is not the only memorial landmark to host a game Pokespot. Since its launch last week, gamers have reported Pokestops in other controversial locations, including The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and New York’s Ground Zero memorial.

Images circulating online in recent days showed the game’s cartoon monsters at several locations inside the Washington, DC, museum, prompting administrators to seek to have the memorial removed from the mobile game, the Washington Post reported Tuesday.

“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

Hollinger told the paper the museum is generally open to new technology, and encourages visitors to share their experiences of visiting the exhibits on social media. “But this game falls very much outside that,” he said.

“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

Hollinger told the paper the museum is generally open to new technology, and encourages visitors to share their experiences of visiting the exhibits on social media. “But this game falls very much outside that,” he said.

The Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Poland says it is not allowing people to play “Pokemon Go” on their smartphones during visits to the former Nazi German death camp because it is “disrespectful on many levels.”

The game uses GPS and mapping capabilities in smartphones to let players roam the real world to find “Pokestops” stocked with supplies and hunt cartoon character monsters to capture and train them for battles.

Museum spokesman Pawel Sawicki told The Associated Press on Wednesday that its authorities were asking game producers to exclude the site of the former Nazi German death camp from games.

Allowing such games to be active on the authentic grounds of the former death camp is “disrespectful to the memory of the victims of the German Nazi concentration and extermination camp on many levels and it is absolutely inappropriate,” Sawicki said.

Sawicki added the museum had already contacted game creators and asked them “not to allow the site of Auschwitz Memorial and other similar sites to be included in the game.”

The museum at Auschwitz is not the only memorial landmark to host a game Pokespot. Since its launch last week, gamers have reported Pokestops in other controversial locations, including The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and New York’s Ground Zero memorial.

Images circulating online in recent days showed the game’s cartoon monsters at several locations inside the Washington, DC, museum, prompting administrators to seek to have the memorial removed from the mobile game, the Washington Post reported Tuesday.

“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

Hollinger told the paper the museum is generally open to new technology, and encourages visitors to share their experiences of visiting the exhibits on social media. “But this game falls very much outside that,” he said.

According to online reports, there are at least four Pokestops at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum to the victims of the 2001 terrorist attacks, including the twin memorial pools that feature the names of those who perished in the attacks.

Officials from the New York City memorial on Wednesday had not issued a statement on the phenomenon, though many visitors had expressed anger at seeing Pokemon Go gamers at site, and called for Ground Zero to be off-limits to the smartphone game.

The free application based on a Nintendo title that debuted 20 years ago has been adapted to the mobile internet age by Niantic Labs, a company spun out of Google last year after breaking ground with Ingress, a game that merged mapping capabilities with play.

Ingress ran into similar problems when it was released in 2015.

After players were seen battling for control of Auschwitz, Dachau and Sachsenhausen and were met with outrage, the company removed the former Nazi camps from game locations.

“After we were made aware that a number of historical markers on the grounds of former concentration camps in Germany had been added, we determined that they did not meet the spirit of our guidelines and began the process of removing them in Germany and elsewhere in Europe,” Ninatic said in a statement at the time.

On Tuesday, Pokemon Go had been downloaded millions of times, topping rankings at official online shops for applications tailored for smartphones powered by Apple or Google-backed Android software.

According to the research firm SimilarWeb, the game was downloaded in more than five percent of Android phones in the first two days of release and had outpaced the dating app Tinder.

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US Holocaust Museum asks visitors to stop chasing Pokemon

Cartoon monsters also spotted at ‘PokeStops’ in former Nazi death camp Auschwitz, New York’s Ground Zero memorial

pokemon-friendsVisitors to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have been asked to refrain from playing the wildly popular augmented reality game Pokemon Go while at the memorial to the 6 million Jews slaughtered by Nazi Germany.

Images circulating online in recent days showed the game’s cartoon monsters at several locations inside the Washington, DC, museum, prompting administrators to seek to have the memorial removed from the mobile game, the Washington Post reported Tuesday.

“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

Hollinger told the paper the museum is generally open to new technology, and encourages visitors to share their experiences of visiting the exhibits on social media. “But this game falls very much outside that,” he said.

“On Monday afternoon, there were plenty of people inside the museum who seemed to be distracted from its haunting exhibits as they tried to ‘catch ’em all,’ as the Pokémon slogan goes,” the Post report said.

The game uses GPS and mapping capabilities in mobile phones to let players roam the real world to find “PokeStops” stocked with supplies and hunt cartoon character monsters to capture and train for battles.

Washington’s Holocaust museum is not the only memorial landmark to host a game PokeSpot. Since its launch last week, gamers have reported PokeStops in other controversial locations, including New York’s Ground Zero memorial and the former Nazi death camp Auschwitz.

An anonymous gamer on Monday informed New York Magazine that he was able to capture a Rattata monster while visiting the Auschwitz museum.

Visitors to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum have been asked to refrain from playing the wildly popular augmented reality game Pokemon Go while at the memorial to the 6 million Jews slaughtered by Nazi Germany.

Images circulating online in recent days showed the game’s cartoon monsters at several locations inside the Washington, DC, museum, prompting administrators to seek to have the memorial removed from the mobile game, the Washington Post reported Tuesday.

“Playing the game is not appropriate in the museum, which is a memorial to the victims of Nazism,” museum communications director Andrew Hollinger told The Post. “We are trying to find out if we can get the museum excluded from the game.”

Hollinger told the paper the museum is generally open to new technology, and encourages visitors to share their experiences of visiting the exhibits on social media. “But this game falls very much outside that,” he said.

“On Monday afternoon, there were plenty of people inside the museum who seemed to be distracted from its haunting exhibits as they tried to ‘catch ’em all,’ as the Pokémon slogan goes,” the Post report said.

The game uses GPS and mapping capabilities in mobile phones to let players roam the real world to find “PokeStops” stocked with supplies and hunt cartoon character monsters to capture and train for battles.

Washington’s Holocaust museum is not the only memorial landmark to host a game PokeSpot. Since its launch last week, gamers have reported PokeStops in other controversial locations, including New York’s Ground Zero memorial and the former Nazi death camp Auschwitz.

An anonymous gamer on Monday informed New York Magazine that he was able to capture a Rattata monster while visiting the Auschwitz museum.

The free application based on a Nintendo title that debuted 20 years ago has been adapted to the mobile internet age by Niantic Labs, a company spun out of Google last year after breaking ground with Ingress, a game that merged mapping capabilities with play.

Ingress ran into similar problems when it was released in 2015.

After players were seen battling for control of Auschwitz, Dachau and Sachsenhausen was met with outrage, the company removed the former Nazi camps from game locations.

“After we were made aware that a number of historical markers on the grounds of former concentration camps in Germany had been added, we determined that they did not meet the spirit of our guidelines and began the process of removing them in Germany and elsewhere in Europe,” Ninatic said in a statement at the time.

On Tuesday, Pokemon Go had been downloaded millions of times, topping rankings at official online shops for applications tailored for smartphones powered by Apple or Google-backed Android software.

According to the research firm SimilarWeb, the game was downloaded in more than five percent of Android phones in the first two days of release and had outpaced the dating app Tinder.

Source

New Android game invites users to ‘play in Auschwitz’

Campo di Auschwitz Online was developed as a smartphone game that allows users to “live like a real Jew” in a concentration camp.

SmpartphoneA disturbing new application was displayed in the “Google Play” store that invites users to “play in Auschwitz” Italian newspaper The Repubblica reported on Sunday.

Campo di Auschwitz Online, which the developers said was designed with a goal of enjoyment, was made available on the Android platform and received online reviews of 3.1 stars out of 5.

The homepage of the application features a Star of David alongside train tracks with the words “Auschwitz Concentration Camp” superimposed above.

As a graphic of what can only be assumed to be a Jewish person escaping from the camp appears alongside the disconcerting mantra of the game appears in letter over an image of the concentration camp’s gate: Live like a real Jew in Auschwitz Concentration Camp.

The developers of the game commented that it was intended to be a parody but confirmed that they support games with violent content. As a graphic of what can only be assumed to be a Jewish person escaping from the camp appears alongside the disconcerting mantra of the game appears in letter over an image of the concentration camp’s gate: Live like a real Jew in Auschwitz Concentration Camp.

The developers of the game commented that it was intended to be a parody but confirmed that they support games with violent content.

Source

WJC resolution urges Hungary to crack down on Jobbik

BUDAPEST, Hungary — As the World Jewish Congress pressed Hungary to crack down further on the Jobbik party, WJC President Ronald Lauder apologized to Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban.
In a resolution passed Tuesday, the WJC called on the Hungarian government to implement laws to protect all citizens, “in particular vulnerable minorities such as the Roma and the Jews,” against “threats of violence, racist hate and insults and the denial of the Holocaust.”
In closing remarks to the WJC plenary assembly, however, Lauder apologized for some of the criticism he had leveled during the assembly at Orban. On Monday, he chastised Orban for not mentioning Jobbik, the country’s third-largest political movement, in the prime minister’s speech to the opening session and suggested Orban was being soft on Jobbik in order to win right-wing votes.
Lauder said he had not known about an interview Orban gave to the Israeli daily Yediot Achronot ahead of the WJC meeting in which Orban had called Jobbik “a real danger, an increasing danger.” Lauder read out Orban’s interview statement, which said that “if we want to protect democracy, we must take a firm stand against Jobbik. Jobbik has developed a political ideology that quite obviously violates the human rights of Jews at both an individual and community level.”
The WJC meeting, usually held every four years in Jerusalem, took place in Budapest to show solidarity with Hungary’s Jewish community in the face of Jobbik’s political rise and a series of anti-Semitic incidents.
Jobbik, which uses virulently anti-Israel, anti-Jewish and anti-Roma rhetoric, won nearly 17 percent of the vote in the last elections.
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